A growth mindset enables teachers to understand that they can always improve, as can all of their students, and motivates students to become active drivers of their own learning process, not only in school but in life.

Eduardo Briceño wasn’t one for public speaking when he was asked to give a TEDx talk in the fall of 2012. But in six weeks he pulled together a powerful discussion about understanding the growth mindset that more than 1.5 million people have viewed online since.

Reaction to his talk about creating a learning-oriented world grew, prompting more than 70 invitations to speak at conferences and school districts, many of which focus on underserved  communities. Eduardo says the power of mindset can equalize opportunities for students. (His second TEDx talk is scheduled for November.)

Before Eduardo became Co-Founder and CEO at Mindset Works, the global leader in growth mindset training for educators and students, he was inspired by his wife Allison’s work as a bilingual teacher in East Palo Alto, CA.

Eduardo explains, “Her students and their families were Latino immigrants, like I am, but they had not had the same opportunities. That’s when I first personally connected with and understood the opportunity gap, and changed my life trajectory and devoted it to equalizing opportunity at the systems level.”

Eduardo had begun his career as an investment banking analyst, and later provided investment strategy, market analysis, due diligence on new investment opportunities, and management assistance to dozens of portfolio organizations.

When he decided to switch sectors and work full-time in education, EP helped him make the transition.

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As an EP Fellow in 2006, Eduardo worked with New Leaders, where he was part of a national team that wrote a federal grant that encompassed over $250 million over five years to reward exemplary schools and educators and to encourage the sharing of effective practices across five large urban school districts and one nationwide coalition of charter schools.

The following year, Eduardo co-founded Mindset Works. At that time, the phrase “growth mindset” wasn’t a familiar term for most people. His work began to engage adults in the development of a growth mindset in order to enable all students to thrive. He notes that when teachers learn that they can always improve -- as can all of their students -- both teachers and students become empowered. Growth mindset has had a particular benefit for students who face negative stereotypes, such as students of color, low-income students, immigrants, and girls in math and science.

Embracing personal transformation has helped Eduardo advance societal transformation based on research by Mindset Works co-founders Carol Dweck, Ph.D. and Lisa Blackwell, Ph.D. and by other psychologists and educators.

His work and impact include helping to increase awareness, understanding, and practice of growth mindset, and directly impacting over a million educators and students through growth mindset talks and trainings.

Eduardo was recognized as one of EP’s 10 EPic Alumni in 2016.